A Droning Drone Warfare Technology That Will Make The Fourth Amendment Obsolete

Posted on February 27, 2013

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PLease watch this must see video, Airforce Bugbots. It is an animation of  drone technology that the US Air Force and defense contractors are currently developing that will end your right to protection from unlawful search and seizure.

Scared? You should be!

I came across this video at the always interesting What We Think and Why blog hosted by Grant Davies. He linked an article at Mediaite, which quotes from an article at National Geographic. Here are some excerpts from Mediaite:

The science writer, John Horgan, described what information he was able to access from the government:

The Air Force has nonetheless already constructed a “micro-aviary” at Wright-Patterson for flight-testing small drones. It’s a cavernous chamber—35 feet high and covering almost 4,000 square feet—with padded walls. Micro-aviary researchers, much of whose work is classified, decline to let me witness a flight test. But they do show me an animated video starring micro-UAVs that resemble winged, multi-legged bugs. The drones swarm through alleys, crawl across windowsills, and perch on power lines. One of them sneaks up on a scowling man holding a gun and shoots him in the head.

The Air Force describes these new “micro-air” weapons as “Unobtrusive, pervasive, lethal.”

{…}

According to Horgan, however, the U.S. government “takes seriously” the potential for widespread proliferation of “micro-drone” technology among terrorists and governments:

What, one might ask, will prevent terrorists and criminals from getting their hands on some kind of lethal drone? Although American officials rarely discuss the threat in public, they take it seriously.

[...] Exercises carried out by security agencies suggest that defending against small drones would be difficult. Under a program called Black Dart, a mini-drone two feet long tested defenses at a military range. A video from its onboard camera shows a puff of smoke in the distance, from which emerges a tiny dot that rapidly grows larger before whizzing harmlessly past: That was a surface-to-air missile missing its mark. In a second video an F-16 fighter plane races past the drone without spotting it.

The answer to the threat of drone attacks, some engineers say, is more drones.

Technology is the proverbial genie that once it is out of the bottle there is no putting it back {Think nuclear weapons}. It is easy to see why our government sees these Micro Air Vehicles (MAV) as extremely useful in combating terrorism, patrolling the country’s borders, and hunting down criminals. But, how long would it be before the enemies have their own MAV air force. Imagine what future wars might be like. The National Geographic article addresses this:

What, one might ask, will prevent terrorists and criminals from getting their hands on some kind of lethal drone? Although American officials rarely discuss the threat in public, they take it seriously. The militant Islamic group Hezbollah, based in Lebanon, says it has obtained drones from Iran. Last November a federal court sentenced a Massachusetts man to 17 years in prison for plotting to attack Washington, D.C., with drones loaded with C-4 explosives.

Exercises carried out by security agencies suggest that defending against small drones would be difficult. Under a program called Black Dart, a mini-drone two feet long tested defenses at a military range. A video from its onboard camera shows a puff of smoke in the distance, from which emerges a tiny dot that rapidly grows larger before whizzing harmlessly past: That was a surface-to-air missile missing its mark. In a second video an F-16 fighter plane races past the drone without spotting it.

The answer to the threat of drone attacks, some engineers say, is more drones. “The new field is counter-UAVs,” says Stephen Griffiths, an engineer for the Utah-based avionics firm Procerus Technologies. Artificial-vision systems designed by Procerus would enable one UAV to spot and destroy another, either by ramming it or shooting it down. “If you can dream it,” Griffiths says, “you can do it.” Eventually drones may become smart enough to operate autonomously, with minimal human supervision. But Griffiths believes the ultimate decision to attack will remain with humans.

More worrisome, of course, is that any tyrant could use this technology to put an end to any desent from citizens. Any tyrant could be local police, the military or national security apparatus, or a country’s president.

I have to wonder if mankind will eventually invent itself into obsolescence?

Well, that’s what I’m thinking. What are your thoughts?

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