Let’s Talk About Murder and Gun Control

I surrender. The last thing I wanted to talk about today was anything that could be remotely related to the Tucson tragedy. I went to all my usual sources, both conservative and liberal, looking for the inspiration that I can normally  find with only a little effort for a subject to write about in my blog. Apparently, the only subject anyone is talking about is the Tucson tragedy. So who am I to buck the trend.

Surely as night follows day, there will be renewed calls for more gun controls. It always happens after “news worthy” murders. Very briefly then I want to talk to you about my views on the relationship (or the lack there of) between murder and gun control.

First, a disclaimer. I have zero expertise in this area. I am, however, a reasonably good observer and what I have observed is that there is no relationship between gun control and murder rates. i should also tell you that I have never owned a gun. I was raised in an industrial city in Michigan and because my father wasn’t into hunting, I was never introduced to guns. But I’ve lived the last eighteen years in Venezuela and for the last eight years I, for the first time in my life, wish I could own and carry a gun.

Prior to Chavez, it was difficult but possible to get a permit to own a gun. For the last twelve years under Chavez, there is no legal way to purchase a gun of any kind.

Let me share some information about Venezuela. In area, it is a little bigger than Texas and has a population of around 28 million or about 9% of that of the United States. Before Chavez, the annual homicide rate varied between 3,000 and 4,000. Along comes Chavez spewing his divisiveness of hate between the haves and the have-nots and between the races. The direct result, according to this non-expert, is that in 2009 Venezuela had 20,000 homicides. It’s hard to wrap your mind around that number, isn’t it? And this in a country where it is illegal to buy or own a gun. This compares to 15,000 in the United States which has more than ten times the population and where it is legal to own guns.

So, did strict gun control in Venezuela reduce the murder rate? Not hardly. The cause of the horrendous murder rate in Venezuela obviously has to do with other factors; most likely cultural and not whether guns are legal or illegal. 

Well, there you have it; my unscientific analysis of the value of gun controls. What do you think?

Categories: Uncategorized

20 thoughts on “Let’s Talk About Murder and Gun Control

  1. It would be interesting to find out how many of those 20000 murders are by guns – I am sure quite a few. Which points to the obviousness of gun control laws, it only prevents law-abiding citizens from owning guns – you know, the people that don’t murder people in the first place.

  2. Good one. I cannot imagine being without a peace maker. Growing up in a rural area, this is what gave us a good nights sleep. They are beating us down, Every day in whatever way. Keep in mind, this is a distraction from what Obama is about. We need to stay focused on him and his Czars. Sarkozy is worrisome. Watch what happens to our dollar.

  3. To be honest, I can’t believe that the guy didn’t get drilled by someone in the crowd in Tucson. It must’ve been over too quickly. But, I have to say, we raise women right! I believe I heard that a woman took the gun after the guy was taken down and she ejected the clip, and another woman, wounded, took the second clip away from him. He’s lucky they didn’t get together, reload, and let him have it with his own gun.

    I am of the group that recognizes that passing gun laws doesn’t stop LAW BREAKERS from breaking laws, it just leaves the rest of us unarmed. However, I’m a little surprised that they sell a 30 round clip for a 9mm Glock. That’s a little excessive and it’s tough to imagine a lawful purpose for that much ammo in one magazine. On the other hand, it’s probably aftermarket, and there would be no way to stop it. Then there’s the slippery slope argument against it, which is legitimate whenever you’re talking about gun rights.

  4. I think any actual study done, before it is buried, comes to the same conclusion as you. As for here in the US, we’ve have record gun sales, and crime is down, which is the opposite that what would be expected in a down economy.

  5. I think you are right on! In the United States some of the highest crime areas are those areas with the most strict gun control laws. The fact is that there is less of a chance of a person committing a violent crime when there is a higher likelyhood that the potential victim of that crime might have a gun.

    1. I think you’re right Steve. Somewhere in the dark recesses of my mind I seem to recall a time , maybe 20 or 25 years ago, in Florida they were experiencing an epidemic of attacks of robbing people and stealing their cars. This county passed a regulation that everyone had to carry a gun or could carry a gun ,I don’t remember which. But the crime rate fell dramatically because the criminals had to assume that their intended victim was armed.

  6. What gun control would do in a place like Venezuela is ensure the poor, the small, the weak and law abiding have no means to defend themselves while, the criminals can buy illegal weapons and go about their business with impunity.

    In every country where there is gun control, the weak, the poor and the law abiding always have to live in fear while the criminals carry on doing what they do.

  7. I don’t have a gun, but I see some riff-raff in my town that has no problem getting them. It would be nice to see a counterweight to armed criminals.

  8. You and your unscientific study have shown in plain English what the liberals and other gun control advocates refuse to admit. It’s people that kill people, not guns. Great post.

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