The Nazi Hunters Missed A few Thanks To The US Department of (in)Justice and The US Taxpayers

Apparently, there are still a few investigative journalist at Associated Press (AP). A two-year investigation has turned up an ugly and shameful bit of US history. Fox News picked up the AP story today.

The Justice Department denied using Social Security payments as a tool for removing Nazi suspects. But records show the U.S. State Department and the Social Security Administration voiced grave concerns over the methods used by the Justice Department’s Nazi-hunting unit, the Office of Special Investigations.

State officials derogatorily called the practice “Nazi dumping” and claimed the OSI was bargaining with suspects so they would leave voluntarily.

Since 1979, the AP analysis found, at least 38 of 66 suspects removed from the United States kept their Social Security benefits.

Legislation that would have closed the Social Security loophole failed 15 years ago, partly due to opposition from the OSI. Since then, according to the AP’s analysis, at least 10 Nazi suspects kept their benefits after leaving. The Social Security Administration confirmed payments to seven who are deceased. One living suspect was confirmed through an AP interview. Two others met the conditions to keep their benefits.

Of the 66 suspects, at least four are alive, living in Europe on U.S. Social Security.

Contrary to denials by the Justice Department’s Office of Special Investigation (OSI), this was not a flaw in the system. It was a feature. Furthermore, when legislation was proposed in 1999 to close this Social Security loophole was defeated in part due to resistance by the OSI.

Legislation that would have closed the Social Security loophole failed 15 years ago, partly due to opposition from the OSI. Since then, according to the AP’s analysis, at least 10 Nazi suspects kept their benefits after leaving. The Social Security Administration confirmed payments to seven who are deceased. One living suspect was confirmed through an AP interview. Two others met the conditions to keep their benefits.

Of the 66 suspects, at least four are alive, living in Europe on U.S. Social Security.

In newly uncovered Social Security Administration records, the AP found that by March 1999, 28 suspected Nazi criminals had collected $1.5 million in Social Security payments after their removal from the U.S.

Since then, the AP estimates the amount paid out has reached into the millions. That estimate is based on the number of suspects who qualified and the three decades that have passed since the first former Nazis, Arthur Rudolph and John Avdzej, signed agreements that required them to leave the country but ensured their benefits would continue.

This incredibly shameful behavior by our Department of Justice in beyond my comprehension. However, this much I do understand. If the DOJ wants you or I behind bars, they will pursue us to the hubs of hell; but bringing Nazi war criminals to justice is apparently too much bother for them. Easier to convince them to leave the country with benefits. Benefits paid for by you, of course.

Well, that’s what I’m thinking. What are your thoughts?

 

 

 

 

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8 thoughts on “The Nazi Hunters Missed A few Thanks To The US Department of (in)Justice and The US Taxpayers

  1. Of course the US government brought many of them here through Operation Paperclip so they knew where they were all along. Guess I am going to have to go get my tinfoil hat out again…

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